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Fallow Deer Were Seen On The Dilek Peninsula

Fallow deer were photographed by camera traps on the Dilek Peninsula.

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Fallow deer on the Dilek Peninsula were seen. This is a very important incident as these fallow deer are an endangered species. The National Park, located at the Great Meander River delta in Güzelçamlı, Kuşadası, is now home for fallow deer, providing them a safe shelter.

Fallow deer on the Dilek Peninsula were photographed by camera traps on the Dilek Peninsula. The news is shared on all kind of websites and the social media. As fallow deer are an endangered species, many people from Turkey and from different parts of the world but especially the staff of the National Park were highly excited about it.

The Dilek Peninsula – the Great Meander Delta National Park, hosts many endangered species of endemic plants and animals. All visitors entering the park are warned by the park officials not to give any harm to plants and animals. Endemic species are the species that grow in that specific area only and have no chance of growing anywhere else. Therefore, they should be taken care of very well in their own habitat.

Fallow deer on the Dilek Peninsula are an endangered species, which means that they are animals in danger of extinction, they are the ones to be taken care of diligently in the Dilek Peninsula National Park.  The Dilek Peninsula National Park is considered as one of the significant parks in the world because of its interesting characteristics. There are not only Mediterranean plants species but also species of the Europe-Siberia and Iran-Turan regions. Also, it has a rich variety of wildlife species. There are 37 types of mammals and 47 types of reptilians living in the Park. The National Park is providing a save shelter for endangered species like the fallow deer and the Mediterranean seals.

Fallow Deer On The Dilek Peninsula Live Here Since 2010

Fallow deer on the Dilek Peninsula live there since 2010.  Koray Aşık, the manager of the Güzelçamlı National Park, has made a statement about the fallow deer, photographed by camera traps on the Dilek Peninsula. He said that 20 fallow deer were brought from the Antalya Fallow Deer Rearing Station to the National Park in 2010. Since then, they were checked and traced by using 23 camera traps. Artificial watering areas were established for them. Their number has increased to 40, starting from 20, since 2010. It can be concluded that fallow deer have adapted to the national park.

The fallow deer were photographed by camera traps on the Dilek Peninsula, and this video showing them, has been revealed. On the video, it can be seen that the fallow deer are moving in pairs and spending more time on the water sides.

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